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Details for Transportation Vehicle, Equipment and Systems Inspectors, Except Aviation


Inspect and monitor transportation equipment, vehicles or systems to ensure compliance with regulations and safety standards.


  • Investigate and make recommendations on carrier requests for waiver of federal standards.
  • Conduct vehicle or transportation equipment tests, using diagnostic equipment.
  • Examine carrier operating rules, employee qualification guidelines, and carrier training and testing programs for compliance with regulations or safety standards.
  • Examine transportation vehicles, equipment, or systems to detect damage, wear, or malfunction.
  • Inspect repairs to transportation vehicles and equipment to ensure that repair work was performed properly.
  • Inspect vehicles and other equipment for evidence of abuse, damage, or mechanical malfunction.
  • Inspect vehicles or equipment to ensure compliance with rules, standards or regulations.
  • Investigate complaints regarding safety violations.
  • Investigate incidents or violations, such as delays, accidents, and equipment failures.
  • Issue notices and recommend corrective actions when infractions or problems are found.
  • Prepare reports on investigations or inspections, and actions taken.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.


Related Careers

  • Bus Drivers, Transit and Intercity
  • Freight and Cargo Inspectors
  • Locomotive Engineers
  • Mates- Ship, Boat, and Barge
  • Rail Yard Engineers, Dinkey Operators, and Hostlers
  • Railroad Brake, Signal, and Switch Operators
  • Railroad Conductors and Yardmasters
  • Ship Engineers
  • Subway and Streetcar Operators
  • Traffic Technicians
Wages for this career
America's Career InfoNet