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Details for Glass Blowers, Molders, Benders, and Finishers


Description

Shape molten glass according to patterns.

Tasks

  • Blow tubing into specified shapes to prevent glass from collapsing, using compressed air or own breath, or blow and rotate gathers in molds or on boards to obtain final shapes.
  • Cut lengths of tubing to specified sizes, using files or cutting wheels.
  • Design and create glass objects, using blowpipes and artisans' hand tools and equipment.
  • Determine types and quantities of glass required to fabricate products.
  • Dip ends of blowpipes into molten glass to collect gobs on pipe heads, or cut gobs from molten glass, using shears.
  • Heat glass to pliable stage, using gas flames or ovens, and rotating glass to heat it uniformly.
  • Inspect, weigh, and measure products to verify conformance to specifications, using instruments such as micrometers, calipers, magnifiers, and rulers.
  • Place electrodes in tube ends and heat them with glass burners to fuse them into place.
  • Place glass into dies or molds of presses, and control presses to form products such as glassware components or optical blanks.
  • Place rubber hoses on ends of tubing, and charge tubing with gas.
  • Repair broken scrolls by replacing them with new sections of tubing.
  • Set up and adjust machine press stroke lengths and pressures, and regulate oven temperatures according to glass types to be processed.
  • Shape, bend, or join sections of glass, using paddles, pressing and flattening hand tools, or cork.
  • Spray or swab molds with oil solutions to prevent adhesion of glass.
  • Strike necks of finished articles to separate articles from blowpipes.
  • Superimpose bent tubing on asbestos patterns to ensure accuracy.
  • Develop sketches of glass products into blueprint specifications, applying knowledge of glass technology and glass blowing.
  • Operate and maintain finishing machines to grind, drill, sand, bevel, decorate, wash, and/or polish glass or glass products.
  • Operate electric kilns that heat glass sheets and molds to the shape and curve of metal jigs.
  • Record manufacturing information such as quantities, sizes, and types of goods produced.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Artistic - Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.

Skills

Related Careers

  • Etchers and Engravers
  • Molding and Casting Workers
  • Packers and Packagers, Hand
Wages for this career
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