CareerShip Home
About CareerShip
Contact Us
Mapping Your Future
Visit the Featured Career Match My Career Interests
Review Careers by Clusters Career Search

Details for Shoe and Leather Workers and Repairers


Construct, decorate, or repair leather and leather-like products, such as luggage, shoes, and saddles.


  • Check the texture, color, and strength of leather to ensure that it is adequate for a particular purpose.
  • Dress and otherwise finish boots or shoes, as by trimming the edges of new soles and heels to the shoe shape.
  • Clean and polish shoes.
  • Cut, insert, position, and secure paddings, cushioning, and/or linings, using stitches or glue.
  • Draw patterns, using measurements, designs, plaster casts, or customer specifications, and position or outline patterns on work pieces.
  • Estimate the costs of requested products or services such as custom footwear or footwear repair, and receive payment from customers.
  • Inspect articles for defects, and remove damaged or worn parts, using hand tools.
  • Align and stitch or glue materials such as fabric, fleece, leather, or wood, in order to join parts.
  • Attach accessories or ornamentation to decorate or protect products.
  • Attach insoles to shoe lasts, affix shoe uppers, and apply heels and outsoles.
  • Cement, nail, or sew soles and heels to shoes.
  • Construct, decorate, or repair leather products according to specifications, using sewing machines, needles and thread, leather lacing, glue, clamps, hand tools, and/or rivets.
  • Cut out parts following patterns or outlines, using knives, shears, scissors, or machine presses.
  • Drill or punch holes; then insert or attach metal rings, handles, and fastening hardware such as buckles.
  • Dye, soak, polish, paint, stamp, stitch, stain, buff, or engrave leather or other materials to obtain desired effects, decorations, or shapes.
  • Place shoes on lasts to remove soles and heels, using knives and/or pliers.
  • Read prescriptions or specifications, and take measurements to establish the type of product to be made, using calipers, tape measures, or rules.
  • Repair and recondition leather products such as trunks, luggage, shoes, saddles, belts, purses, and baseball gloves.
  • Repair or replace soles, heels, and other parts of footwear, using sewing, buffing and other shoe repair machines, materials, and equipment.
  • Re-sew seams, and replace handles and linings of suitcases or handbags.
  • Select materials and patterns, and trace patterns onto materials to be cut out.
  • Make, modify, and repair orthopedic or therapeutic footwear according to doctors' prescriptions, or modify existing footwear for people with foot problems and special needs.
  • Measure customers for fit, and discuss with them the type of footwear to be made, recommending details such as leather quality.
  • Nail heel and toe cleats onto shoes.
  • Prepare inserts, heel pads, and lifts from casts of customers' feet.
  • Shape shoe heels with a knife, and sand them on a buffing wheel for smoothness.
  • Stretch shoes, first dampening parts; then inserting and twisting parts, using an adjustable stretcher.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Artistic - Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.



Related Careers

  • Etchers and Engravers
  • Fabric Menders, Except Garment
  • Jewelers
  • Sewers, Hand
Wages for this career
America's Career InfoNet