CareerShip Home
About CareerShip
Resources
Contact Us
Mapping Your Future
  back
Visit the Featured Career Match My Career Interests
Review Careers by Clusters Career Search

Details for Pressers, Textile, Garment, and Related Materials


Description

Press or shape articles by hand or machine.

Tasks

  • Select, install, and adjust machine components, including pressing forms, rollers, and guides, using hoists and hand tools.
  • Shrink, stretch, or block articles by hand to conform to original measurements, using forms, blocks, and steam.
  • Activate and adjust machine controls to regulate temperature and pressure of rollers, ironing shoes, or plates, according to specifications.
  • Block or shape knitted garments after cleaning.
  • Hang, fold, package, and tag finished articles for delivery to customers.
  • Lower irons, rams, or pressing heads of machines into position over material to be pressed.
  • Moisten materials to soften and smooth them.
  • Operate steam, hydraulic, or other pressing machines to remove wrinkles from garments and flatwork items, or to shape, form, or patch articles.
  • Position materials such as cloth garments, felt, or straw on tables, dies, or feeding mechanisms of pressing machines, or on ironing boards or work tables.
  • Push and pull irons over surfaces of articles to smooth or shape them.
  • Remove finished pieces from pressing machines and hang or stack them for cooling, or forward them for additional processing.
  • Select appropriate pressing machines, based on garment properties such as heat tolerance.
  • Slide material back and forth over heated, metal, ball-shaped forms to smooth and press portions of garments that cannot be satisfactorily pressed with flat pressers or hand irons.
  • Spray water over fabric to soften fibers when not using steam irons.
  • Straighten, smooth, or shape materials to prepare them for pressing.
  • Use covering cloths to prevent equipment from damaging delicate fabrics.
  • Brush materials made of suede, leather, or felt to remove spots or to raise and smooth naps.
  • Clean and maintain pressing machines, using cleaning solutions and lubricants.
  • Examine and measure finished articles to verify conformance to standards, using measuring devices such as tape measures and micrometers.
  • Finish fancy garments such as evening gowns and costumes, using hand irons to produce high quality finishes.
  • Finish pants, jackets, shirts, skirts and other dry-cleaned and laundered articles, using hand irons.
  • Finish pleated garments, determining sizes of pleats from evidence of old pleats or from work orders, using machine presses or hand irons.
  • Finish velvet garments by steaming them on bucks of hot-head presses or steam tables, and brushing pile (nap) with handbrushes.
  • Insert heated metal forms into ties and touch up rough places with hand irons.
  • Measure fabric to specifications, cut uneven edges with shears, fold material, and press it with an iron to form a heading.
  • Press ties on small pressing machines.
  • Sew ends of new material to leaders or to ends of material in pressing machines, using sewing machines.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Some of these occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.
  • Experience - Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.

Knowledge

Skills

Related Careers

  • Cooling and Freezing Equipment Operators and Tenders
  • Fabric Menders, Except Garment
  • Glass Blowers, Molders, Benders, and Finishers
  • Jewelers
  • Laundry and Dry-Cleaning Workers
  • Prepress Technicians and Workers
  • Printing Machine Operators
  • Sewing Machine Operators
  • Shoe and Leather Workers and Repairers
  • Shoe Machine Operators and Tenders
Wages for this career
America's Career InfoNet