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Details for Welding, Soldering, and Brazing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders


Set up, operate, or tend welding, soldering, or brazing machines or robots that weld, braze, solder, or heat treat metal products, components, or assemblies.


  • Turn and press knobs and buttons, or enter operating instructions into computers to adjust and start welding machines.
  • Set up, operate, and tend welding machines that join or bond components to fabricate metal products or assemblies.
  • Load or feed workpieces into welding machines in order to join or bond components.
  • Give directions to other workers regarding machine setup and use.
  • Correct problems by adjusting controls, or by stopping machines and opening holding devices.
  • Inspect, measure, or test completed metal workpieces to ensure conformance to specifications, using measuring and testing devices.
  • Record operational information on specified production reports.
  • Start, monitor, and adjust robotic welding production lines.
  • Read blueprints, work orders, and production schedules to determine product or job instructions and specifications.
  • Assemble, align, and clamp workpieces into holding fixtures to bond, heat-treat, or solder fabricated metal components.
  • Lay out, fit, or connect parts to be bonded, calculating production measurements as necessary.
  • Conduct trial runs before welding, soldering or brazing; make necessary adjustments to equipment.
  • Dress electrodes, using tip dressers, files, emery cloths, or dressing wheels.
  • Remove workpieces and parts from machinery after work is complete, using hand tools.
  • Observe meters, gauges, and machine operations to ensure that soldering or brazing processes meet specifications.
  • Select, position, align, and bolt jigs, holding fixtures, guides, and stops onto machines, using measuring instruments and hand tools.
  • Select torch tips, alloys, flux, coil, tubing, and wire, according to metal types and thicknesses, data charts, and records.
  • Compute and record settings for new work, applying knowledge of metal properties, principles of welding, and shop mathematics.
  • Prepare metal surfaces and workpieces, using hand-operated equipment such as grinders, cutters, or drills.
  • Clean, lubricate, maintain, and adjust equipment to maintain efficient operation, using air hoses, cleaning fluids, and hand tools.
  • Set dials and timing controls to regulate electrical current, gas flow pressure, heating/cooling cycles, and shut-off.
  • Tend auxiliary equipment used in welding processes.
  • Devise and build fixtures and jigs used to hold parts in place during welding, brazing, or soldering.
  • Fill hoppers and position spouts to direct flow of flux, or manually brush flux onto seams of workpieces.
  • Transfer components, metal products, and assemblies, using moving equipment.
  • Add chemicals and materials to workpieces or machines to facilitate bonding or to cool workpieces.
  • Mark weld points and positions of components on workpieces, using rules, squares, templates, and scribes.
  • Anneal finished workpieces to relieve internal stress.
  • Immerse completed workpieces into water or acid baths to cool and clean components.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.



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