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Details for Foundry Mold and Coremakers


Make or form wax or sand cores or molds used in the production of metal castings in foundries.


  • Position patterns inside mold sections and clamp sections together.
  • Operate ovens or furnaces to bake cores or to melt, skim, and flux metal.
  • Clean and smooth molds, cores, and core boxes, and repair surface imperfections.
  • Cut spouts, runner holes, and sprue holes into molds.
  • Form and assemble slab cores around patterns and position wire in mold sections to reinforce molds, using hand tools and glue.
  • Position cores into lower sections of molds, and reassemble molds for pouring.
  • Sift and pack sand into mold sections, core boxes, and pattern contours, using hand or pneumatic ramming tools.
  • Sprinkle or spray parting agents onto patterns and mold sections to facilitate removal of patterns from molds.
  • Lift upper mold sections from lower sections and remove molded patterns.
  • Move and position workpieces such as mold sections, patterns, and bottom boards, using cranes, or signal others to move workpieces.
  • Pour molten metal into molds, manually or using crane ladles.
  • Rotate sweep boards around spindles in order to make symmetrical molds for convex impressions.
  • Tend machines that bond cope and drag together to form completed shell molds.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.



Related Careers

  • Coil Winders, Tapers, and Finishers
  • Grinding and Polishing Workers, Hand
  • Molding and Casting Workers
  • Patternmakers, Metal and Plastic
  • Plating and Coating Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Pourers and Casters, Metal
  • Precious Metal Workers
  • Solderers and Brazers
  • Welding, Soldering, and Brazing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
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