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Details for Cutting, Punching, and Press Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic


Description

Set up, operate, or tend machines to saw, cut, shear, slit, punch, crimp, notch, bend, or straighten metal or plastic material.

Tasks

  • Measure completed workpieces to verify conformance to specifications, using micrometers, gauges, calipers, templates, or rulers.
  • Examine completed workpieces for defects such as chipped edges and marred surfaces, and sort defective pieces according to types of flaws.
  • Read work orders and production schedules to determine specifications, such as materials to be used, locations of cutting lines, and dimensions and tolerances.
  • Load workpieces, plastic material, or chemical solutions into machines.
  • Set up, operate, or tend machines to saw, cut, shear, slit, punch, crimp, notch, bend, or straighten metal or plastic material.
  • Start machines, monitor their operations, and record operational data.
  • Test and adjust machine speeds and actions, according to product specifications, and using gauges and hand tools.
  • Install, align, and lock specified punches, dies, cutting blades or other fixtures in rams or beds of machines, using gauges, templates, feelers, shims, and hand tools.
  • Clean and lubricate machines.
  • Position, align, and secure workpieces against fixtures or stops on machine beds or on dies.
  • Scribe reference lines on workpieces as guides for cutting operations, according to blueprints, templates, sample parts, or specifications.
  • Set blade tensions, heights, and angles to perform prescribed cuts, using wrenches.
  • Adjust ram strokes of presses to specified lengths, using hand tools.
  • Place workpieces on cutting tables, manually or using hoists, cranes, or sledges.
  • Position guides, stops, holding blocks, or other fixtures to secure and direct workpieces, using hand tools and measuring devices.
  • Thread ends of metal coils from reels through slitters, and secure ends on recoilers.
  • Turn valves to start flow of coolant against cutting areas and to start airflow that blows cuttings away from kerfs.
  • Set stops on machine beds, change dies, and adjust components, such as rams or power presses, when making multiple or successive passes.
  • Lubricate workpieces with oil.
  • Replace defective blades or wheels, using hand tools.
  • Mark identifying data on workpieces.
  • Turn controls to set cutting speeds, feed rates, and table angles for specified operations.
  • Plan sequences of operations, applying knowledge of physical properties of workpiece materials.
  • Hand-form, cut, or finish workpieces, using tools such as table saws, hand sledges, and anvils.
  • Grind out burrs and sharp edges, using portable grinders, speed lathes, and polishing jacks.
  • Sharpen dulled blades, using bench grinders, abrasive wheels, or lathes.
  • Remove housings, feed tubes, tool holders, and other accessories in order to replace worn or broken parts such as springs and bushings.
  • Hone cutters with oilstones to remove nicks.
  • Select, clean, and install spacers, rubber sleeves, and cutters on arbors.
  • Preheat workpieces, using heating furnaces or hand torches.

Interests

  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Knowledge

  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.

Skills

  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.

Related Careers

  • Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal and Plastic
  • Cutting and Slicing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
  • Drilling and Boring Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Extruding and Forming Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Synthetic and Glass Fibers
  • Forging Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Grinding, Lapping, Polishing, and Buffing Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Molding, Coremaking, and Casting Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Multiple Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Plating and Coating Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and Plastic
  • Welding, Soldering, and Brazing Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
Wages for this career
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