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Details for Commercial Divers


Work below surface of water, using scuba gear to inspect, repair, remove, or install equipment and structures. May use a variety of power and hand tools, such as drills, sledgehammers, torches, and welding equipment. May conduct tests or experiments, rig explosives, or photograph structures or marine life.


  • Communicate with workers on the surface while underwater, using signal lines or telephones.
  • Cut and weld steel, using underwater welding equipment, jigs, and supports.
  • Descend into water with the aid of diver helpers, using scuba gear or diving suits.
  • Carry out non-destructive testing such as tests for cracks on the legs of oil rigs at sea.
  • Check and maintain diving equipment such as helmets, masks, air tanks, harnesses and gauges.
  • Inspect and test docks, ships, bouyage systems, plant intakes and outflows, and underwater pipelines, cables, and sewers, using closed circuit television, still photography, and testing equipment.
  • Install pilings or footings for piers and bridges.
  • Install, inspect, clean, and repair piping and valves.
  • Obtain information about diving tasks and environmental conditions.
  • Operate underwater video, sonar, recording, and related equipment to investigate underwater structures or marine life.
  • Perform activities related to underwater search and rescue, salvage, recovery, and cleanup operations.
  • Perform offshore oil and gas exploration and extraction duties such as conducting underwater surveys and repairing and maintaining drilling rigs and platforms.
  • Recover objects by placing rigging around sunken objects, hooking rigging to crane lines, and operating winches, derricks, or cranes to raise objects.
  • Remove obstructions from strainers and marine railway or launching ways, using pneumatic and power hand tools.
  • Repair ships, bridge foundations, and other structures below the water line, using caulk, bolts, and hand tools.
  • Salvage wrecked ships and/or their cargo, using pneumatic power velocity and hydraulic tools, and explosive charges when necessary.
  • Set or guide placement of pilings and sandbags to provide support for structures such as docks, bridges, cofferdams, and platforms.
  • Take appropriate safety precautions, such as monitoring dive lengths and depths, and registering with authorities before diving expeditions begin.
  • Take test samples and photographs to assess the condition of vessels and structures.
  • Drill holes in rock, and rig explosives for underwater demolitions.
  • Remove rubbish and pollution from the sea.
  • Cultivate and harvest marine species, and perform routine work on fish farms.
  • Set up dive sites for recreational instruction.
  • Supervise and train other divers, including hobby divers.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.


  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.


  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.

Related Careers

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  • Pipelayers
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