CareerShip Home
About CareerShip
Contact Us
Mapping Your Future
Visit the Featured Career Match My Career Interests
Review Careers by Clusters Career Search

Details for Data Entry Keyers


Operate data entry device, such as keyboard or photo composing perforator. Duties may include verifying data and preparing materials for printing.


  • Compare data with source documents, or re-enter data in verification format to detect errors.
  • Compile, sort and verify the accuracy of data before it is entered.
  • Locate and correct data entry errors, or report them to supervisors.
  • Maintain logs of activities and completed work.
  • Read source documents such as canceled checks, sales reports, or bills, and enter data in specific data fields or onto tapes or disks for subsequent entry, using keyboards or scanners.
  • Load machines with required input or output media such as paper, cards, disks, tape or Braille media.
  • Resolve garbled or indecipherable messages, using cryptographic procedures and equipment.
  • Select materials needed to complete work assignments.
  • Store completed documents in appropriate locations.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.


  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.


  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Related Careers

  • Billing, Posting, and Calculating Machine Operators
  • Correspondence Clerks
  • File Clerks
  • Word Processors and Typists
Wages for this career
America's Career InfoNet