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Details for Municipal Fire Fighters


Control and extinguish municipal fires, protect life and property and conduct rescue efforts.


  • Administer first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation to injured persons.
  • Rescue victims from burning buildings and accident sites.
  • Search burning buildings to locate fire victims.
  • Drive and operate fire fighting vehicles and equipment.
  • Dress with equipment such as fire resistant clothing and breathing apparatus.
  • Move toward the source of a fire using knowledge of types of fires, construction design, building materials, and physical layout of properties.
  • Position and climb ladders to gain access to upper levels of buildings, or to rescue individuals from burning structures.
  • Take action to contain hazardous chemicals that might catch fire, leak, or spill.
  • Assess fires and situations and report conditions to superiors to receive instructions, using two-way radios.
  • Respond to fire alarms and other calls for assistance, such as automobile and industrial accidents.
  • Operate pumps connected to high-pressure hoses.
  • Select and attach hose nozzles, depending on fire type, and direct streams of water or chemicals onto fires.
  • Create openings in buildings for ventilation or entrance, using axes, chisels, crowbars, electric saws, or core cutters.
  • Inspect fire sites after flames have been extinguished to ensure that there is no further danger.
  • Lay hose lines and connect them to water supplies.
  • Protect property from water and smoke using waterproof salvage covers, smoke ejectors, and deodorants.
  • Participate in physical training activities to maintain a high level of physical fitness.
  • Salvage property by removing broken glass, pumping out water, and ventilating buildings to remove smoke.
  • Participate in fire drills and demonstrations of fire fighting techniques.
  • Clean and maintain fire stations and fire fighting equipment and apparatus.
  • Collaborate with police to respond to accidents, disasters, and arson investigation calls.
  • Establish firelines to prevent unauthorized persons from entering areas near fires.
  • Inform and educate the public on fire prevention.
  • Inspect buildings for fire hazards and compliance with fire prevention ordinances, testing and checking smoke alarms and fire suppression equipment as necessary.
  • Participate in courses, seminars and conferences, and study fire science literature, to learn firefighting techniques.
  • Prepare written reports that detail specifics of fire incidents.
  • Spray foam onto runways, extinguish fires, and rescue aircraft crew and passengers in air-crash emergencies.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.


  • Transportation - Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
  • Psychology - Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Chemistry - Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Building and Construction - Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Public Safety and Security - Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.


  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Related Careers

  • Fire Inspectors
  • Fish and Game Wardens
  • Forest Fire Fighters
  • Forest Fire Fighting and Prevention Supervisors
  • Forest Fire Inspectors and Prevention Specialists
  • Lifeguards, Ski Patrol, and Other Recreational Protective Service Workers
  • Municipal Fire Fighting and Prevention Supervisors
  • Security Guards
  • Transit and Railroad Police
  • Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer
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