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Details for Food Service Managers


Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that serves food and beverages.


  • Test cooked food by tasting and smelling it to ensure palatability and flavor conformity.
  • Investigate and resolve complaints regarding food quality, service, or accommodations.
  • Schedule and receive food and beverage deliveries, checking delivery contents to verify product quality and quantity.
  • Monitor food preparation methods, portion sizes, and garnishing and presentation of food to ensure that food is prepared and presented in an acceptable manner.
  • Monitor budgets and payroll records, and review financial transactions to ensure that expenditures are authorized and budgeted.
  • Schedule staff hours and assign duties.
  • Monitor compliance with health and fire regulations regarding food preparation and serving, and building maintenance in lodging and dining facilities.
  • Coordinate assignments of cooking personnel to ensure economical use of food and timely preparation.
  • Keep records required by government agencies regarding sanitation, and food subsidies when appropriate.
  • Establish standards for personnel performance and customer service.
  • Estimate food, liquor, wine, and other beverage consumption to anticipate amounts to be purchased or requisitioned.
  • Review work procedures and operational problems to determine ways to improve service, performance, or safety.
  • Perform some food preparation or service tasks such as cooking, clearing tables, and serving food and drinks when necessary.
  • Maintain food and equipment inventories, and keep inventory records.
  • Organize and direct worker training programs, resolve personnel problems, hire new staff, and evaluate employee performance in dining and lodging facilities.
  • Order and purchase equipment and supplies.
  • Review menus and analyze recipes to determine labor and overhead costs, and assign prices to menu items.
  • Record the number, type, and cost of items sold to determine which items may be unpopular or less profitable.
  • Take dining reservations.
  • Assess staffing needs, and recruit staff using methods such as newspaper advertisements or attendance at job fairs.
  • Arrange for equipment maintenance and repairs, and coordinate a variety of services such as waste removal and pest control.
  • Monitor employee and patron activities to ensure liquor regulations are obeyed.
  • Greet guests, escort them to their seats, and present them with menus and wine lists.
  • Establish and enforce nutritional standards for dining establishments based on accepted industry standards.
  • Plan menus and food utilization based on anticipated number of guests, nutritional value, palatability, popularity, and costs.
  • Create specialty dishes and develop recipes to be used in dining facilities.
  • Schedule use of facilities or catering services for events such as banquets or receptions, and negotiate details of arrangements with clients.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Social - Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.
  • Experience - Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.


  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Food Production - Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
  • Sales and Marketing - Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
  • Personnel and Human Resources - Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.


  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Negotiation - Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences.
  • Instructing - Teaching others how to do something.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Management of Personnel Resources - Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

Related Careers

  • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Food Preparation and Serving Workers
  • First-Line Supervisors/Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers
  • Lodging Managers
  • Medical and Health Services Managers
  • Recreation Workers
  • Social and Community Service Managers
Wages for this career
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