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Details for Industrial Engineers


Design, develop, test, and evaluate integrated systems for managing industrial production processes including human work factors, quality control, inventory control, logistics and material flow, cost analysis, and production coordination.


  • Analyze statistical data and product specifications to determine standards and establish quality and reliability objectives of finished product.
  • Develop manufacturing methods, labor utilization standards, and cost analysis systems to promote efficient staff and facility utilization.
  • Recommend methods for improving utilization of personnel, material, and utilities.
  • Plan and establish sequence of operations to fabricate and assemble parts or products and to promote efficient utilization.
  • Apply statistical methods and perform mathematical calculations to determine manufacturing processes, staff requirements, and production standards.
  • Coordinate quality control objectives and activities to resolve production problems, maximize product reliability, and minimize cost.
  • Confer with vendors, staff, and management personnel regarding purchases, procedures, product specifications, manufacturing capabilities, and project status.
  • Draft and design layout of equipment, materials, and workspace to illustrate maximum efficiency using drafting tools and computer.
  • Review production schedules, engineering specifications, orders, and related information to obtain knowledge of manufacturing methods, procedures, and activities.
  • Communicate with management and user personnel to develop production and design standards.
  • Estimate production cost and effect of product design changes for management review, action, and control.
  • Formulate sampling procedures and designs and develop forms and instructions for recording, evaluating, and reporting quality and reliability data.
  • Record or oversee recording of information to ensure currency of engineering drawings and documentation of production problems.
  • Study operations sequence, material flow, functional statements, organization charts, and project information to determine worker functions and responsibilities.
  • Direct workers engaged in product measurement, inspection, and testing activities to ensure quality control and reliability.
  • Implement methods and procedures for disposition of discrepant material and defective or damaged parts, and assess cost and responsibility.
  • Evaluate precision and accuracy of production and testing equipment and engineering drawings to formulate corrective action plan.
  • Complete production reports, purchase orders, and material, tool, and equipment lists.
  • Schedule deliveries based on production forecasts, material substitutions, storage and handling facilities, and maintenance requirements.
  • Regulate and alter workflow schedules according to established manufacturing sequences and lead times to expedite production operations.


  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Education, Training, Experience

  • Education - Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
  • Training - Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.
  • Experience - A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.


  • Physics - Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Mechanical - Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
  • Production and Processing - Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
  • Engineering and Technology - Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.


  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  • Systems Evaluation - Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.

Related Careers

  • Aerospace Engineers
  • Industrial Engineering Technicians
  • Materials Engineers
  • Mechanical Engineering Technicians
  • Mining and Geological Engineers, Including Mining Safety Engineers
  • Petroleum Engineers
Wages for this career
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